Arctic Council Agreement On Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation

Arctic Council Agreement On Enhancing International Arctic Scientific Cooperation

2. The parties encourage full and open access to scientific metadata and promote open access to scientific data and data products and published results with a minimum of time, preferably online and free or no more than reproduction and delivery costs. The agreement comes into force today, May 23, 2018, an occasion to be celebrated at an event in Ilulissat, Greenland. This means that the provisions of the agreement are now final and will begin to provide concrete support for scientific activities in the Arctic, for example by facilitating access to research areas for maritime and air data collection, supporting full and open access to scientific data, and encouraging education and career development for students and young scientists. What are the geographic areas of the Arctic to which the agreement applies? A communication protocol with contact points is developed. It is planned for you to work with your own national point of contact which, in turn, will cause problems with its international colleagues. For a map of the area covered by the agreement, click here. What is remarkable is that it was a project in which the United States and Russia, despite sharp differences on other geopolitical issues, worked amicably to achieve a common goal. In a statement issued by the Arctic Council, a senior Russian official said the agreement showed how Arctic Council members are committed to environmental protection and that his government is enthusiastic about cross-border work on scientific projects. As shown on the map below, the U.S. geographic area covered by this agreement includes areas north of the Arctic Circle and north and west of the Porcupine, Yukon and Kuskokwim river border; The chain of aristotles; and adjacent marine areas in the Arctic Ocean and the lakes of Beaufort, Bering and Chukchen.

This area is based on the definition of the Arctic region of the United States in Section 112 of the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984, as amended. 3. Contracting parties also facilitate joint scientific activities that require the collection of aerial scientific data in the identified geographic areas and are subject to specific modalities or agreements between the parties or participants in these activities. “The agreement underscores the importance of scientific diplomacy. It is a signal of will and ability to promote research through international cooperation,” said the Minister. Taking full account of the relevant provisions of the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, in particular the Part XIII provisions on marine scientific exploration, which aim to promote and facilitate the development and implementation of marine scientific research for peaceful purposes; The aim of this agreement is to improve cooperation in scientific activities to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of the development of scientific knowledge about the Arctic. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA U.S. Arctic Research Commission Executive Director, U.S. Arctic Research Commission 4350 N. Fairfax Dr., Suite 510, Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: 1,703,525,0113 E-mail: info@arctic.gov The agreement covers, among other things, access to data, intellectual property protection, access to infrastructure and facilities, and travel for scientists.

It stresses the need to “strengthen mitigation and adaptation to climate change” and also encourages the use of traditional and local knowledge in the planning and implementation of scientific activities. The agreement to improve international scientific cooperation in the Arctic was signed a year ago at the Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting in Fairbanks, the event that limited the U.S. presidency of the Eight Nations Organization for two years. The scientific agreement was one of the successes of this term, cited by the United States, and was used as an example of how Arctic nations can work peacefully on issues of